Australia - Colonial: 1900-1917.
Delivery form: A-DO-12.


Random facts in no real order or elaboration.
  1. Andrew Carnegie started work as a telegraph messenger and served as a telegrapher for 12 years.

  2. Thomas Edison started work as a telegrapher when he was 17;

  3. Gene Autrey (the "singing cowboy") was a railroad telegrapher when he was young - a long time before he died in 1998 at the age of 91;

  4. WRONG ADVT. Telegram Form Used - Fine of £2
    YOUNG, Saturday.

    Publishing an advertisement of a sale in the form of an urgent telegram was an offence under the Police Act alleged against Arthur Coffey, a business man, at the Young Police Court. He was fined £2, and the newspaper which printed the advertisement was similarly penalised on a charge of having aided and abetted. It was stated that both defendants had acted in ignorance of the law.

  5. The Geelong Advertiser gives a story that a "few mornings ago, an elderly female who had just arrived by train from Meredith rushed up in frantic haste to the telegraph office, knocked loudly at the receiving-box and, upon a clerk answering her summons, she pulled a big key out of her pocket and excitedly asked what it would cost to send it along the line to Meredith. She had, she said, left after her old man had gone to his work, and had unwittingly put the house door key into her pocket and he would not be able to get in for his dinner. This is no canard - it is a simple fact". (Ed: Ah - if she only had access to a 3D printer :)

  6. Saved Life by Cutting Telegraph Line With Bullet.

    PERTH, Sunday. Death from thirst and lack of food was narrowly averted by Thomas Hamilton, 51, who, while walking from a pastoral station to Derby, was lost for three days in grass which grows to a height of 15ft.

    He came out at the telegraph line about 66 miles from Broome, dropped his swag and apparently walked one mile and a half along the line. He then shot down an insulator of the telegraph wire with his rifle and severed the line with a second bullet.

    A telegraph linesman, who went out to locate the breakdown, found Hamilton lying exhausted and naked in a hole he had dug in the ground with his fingers to find water. Hamilton said that he had kept the third bullet for himself in case no help came. The linesman took him to Broome Hospital where he is recovering".
    The Argus 10 April 1939.

  7. Listening to the Telegraph Poles in Flanders:

    The Camp Chronicle (Midland Junction WA) of 4 July 1918 notes:

"that if you happen to notice a person leaning against a telegraph pole,hesitate ere you draw uncharitable conclusions. Some ingenious slacker has discovered that the best way of hearing the guns in Flanders is to put your ear to the posts which support the telegraph wires".